Inspiration from Early Morning Yoga Class

The narratives we tell ourselves - real or imagined - shape the way we interact with the world.

As I was settling in to start a Sunday morning yoga class, the instructor noted that thinking is a form of storytelling. The narratives we tell ourselves — real or imagined — shape the way we interact with the world. Our thoughts impact the way we show up for our friends, our loved ones, ourselves.

And as I traveled to London to present on curriculum storyboards, the emergent narrative of how this idea, crafted with Heidi Hayes Jacobs opens up fresh possibilities and new ventures.

I recently received an email from a principal in Wales where he shared:
“I think you have now started some form of compulsive behaviour in me (for the better!!!)….I’m seeing the potential for storyboarding everywhere! I’ve embarked on a challenge to apply storyboarding principles to communicate our curriculum framework, curriculum design, underlying principles, rationale and real world examples of what this looks like in practice. I’m about halfway through at present and it seems to be working well.”
As I continue to grow the idea with school clients, I want to be open to iterations of how it translates in the classroom. Diving more deeply into the connection between curriculum storyboards and personalized learning.
  • How do students navigate a path that has been laid out for them to spark their own inquiries, ideas, and actions?
  • In what ways can students become increasingly self directed in monitoring and modifying their learning to pursue both school and personal goals?
  • How might students tell their own story informed by the learning experiences they have within and outside of the school walls?
Looking forward to stay connected with you on this journey!

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Work with Allison

Just as Allison advocates for personalized learning to be used by her clients, she practices it when engaging with her clients. It is important to Allison that she develop a relationship with those she pours into, preferring long standing relationships over quick, one-off sessions.

Toolkits by Allison Zmuda & Bena Kallick